Course Syllabi


>EE E1201y Introduction to Electrical Engineering


Description: Basic concepts of electrical engineering. Exploration of selected topics and their application. Electrical variables, circuit laws, nonlinear and linear elements, ideal and real sources, transducers, operational amplifiers in simple circuits, external behavior of diodes and transistors, first order RC and RL circuits. Digital representation of a signal, digital logic gates, flip-flops. A laboratory is an integral part of the course. Required of electrical engineering and computer engineering majors.

Prerequisites: Math. V1101 (Calculus 1A) or V1105 (Calculus 1S)

Text: A. R. Hambley, Electrical Engineering Principles and Applications. Prentice-Hall, 1997.

Course Objectives: To teach students the basics of circuits and electronics with emphasis on intuition, laboratory work, and applications. To make today's student somewhat of a hobbyist, at least for the duration of the course and perhaps for a lifetime. To provide extensions to other fields in Electrical Engineering. To motivate students to look forward to other EE courses and Electrical Engineering as a whole.

Topics Covered: Electrical variables, circuit laws, nonlinear and linear elements, ideal and real sources, transducers, comparators, operational amplifiers in simple circuits, external behavior of diodes and transistors, first order RC and RL circuits, LC circuits, frequency response, radio reception. Digital representation of a signal, digital logic gates, flip-flops, shift registers and counters.

Class/Laboratory Schedule: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour lab session per week.

Professional Component Contributions: Students are exposed to circuits and electronics basics and to experimentation and design, and learn to ask "what if" questions in the laboratory. At a rudimentary level, they get exposed to the type of approaches encountered in professional engineering practice. The context provided by the course also serves to motivate the students to pay attention to subsequent EE courses and to the professional component contributions those courses provide.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

EE Objective A: This is not a basic sciences or mathematics course. It does, however, illustrate the use of some physics and mathematics that the students have learned in other courses, and introduces students to engineering problem-solving techniques.

EE Objective B: This is the first course in EE. It provides a foundation for subsequent electrical and computer engineering courses, and thus for an EE career. The course is broad-based, covering circuits, electronics, but also an introduction to sensors, computer engineering, and communications. It is emphasized to the students that they have to seek breadth in their education, in today's multi-disciplinary world. The contents of the course serve as an example of such breadth.

EE Objective C: Students are exposed to engineering teamwork by working together in teams of two or three in the lab, in the design and testing of simple circuits.

EE Objective D: Ethical issues are introduced through the IEEE Code of Ethics, which prominently hangs on the wall of our laboratory.

EE Objective E: This is a course that introduces students to design through two design projects, in the fifth and in the last week of classes. For the second design project, the students are encouraged to design a circuit they are interested in. The interrelation between theory and practice is constantly emphasized throughout the course.

How Assessed: (not required by ABET) A questionnaire is given out after the first three weeks, and another one at the end of the course. During laboratory experiment development, questionnaires were given out at the end of each lab session, greatly helping to improve the experiments and make them robust and exciting to the students.

Actions Taken to Improve Course: (not require by ABET) New experiments were introduced each year. This year, for example, an experiment on frequency response has been introduced, in which students, after measurements, test their circuits by using them to process music from their favorite CDs and listening to the result.

Prepared by: Yannis Tsividis

Date Prepared: May 5, 2000.


 

EE E3000 Introduction to Circuits, Systems, and Electronics.

Description: Introductory course in electrical circuits, systems, electronics, and digital information processing for non-electrical engineers. Selected topics include analysis of DC and AC circuits containing resistors, capacitors, inductors and both real and ideal sources. The transient behavior of simple RL, RC and RLC circuits is also presented. Operational amplifiers in simple circuits, diodes and transistors, both bipolar and FET are covered. Boolean algebra, truth tables and digital logic gates are also included.

Prerequisites: none

Text: J. R. Cogdell, Foundations of Electrical Engineering, Prentice-Hall 1996.

Course Objectives: To teach students the basics of circuits, circuit elements, circuit analysis and electronics with reference to actual applications and impact in modern industry. Classroom demos of selected applications are used. To instruct the non-electrical engineer into the concepts, techniques and language of electrical engineering.

Topics Covered: Circuit laws including equivalent circuits, circuit elements, electrical variables, real and ideal sources, first order RL and RC circuit analysis with extension to RLC circuits, operational amplifiers in simple circuits. Introduction to conduction mechanisms in semiconductors, real and ideal diodes and bipolar and field effect transistors. Basics of digital logic, logic gates, Boolean algebra and truth tables.

Class Schedule: Two 80 minute lectures.

Professional Component Contribution: Students are exposed to important concepts in circuits and electronics and how these concepts are useful in future job-related activities and applications. As a result of taking this course the non-electrical engineer will be able to relate on a meaningful level with electrical phenomena and with electrical engineers.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

EE Objective: While this is not a basic science or mathematics course, it does illustrate the use physics and mathematics in solving electrical engineering problems. As this is also the only EE course that these students may take, some teaching of basic concepts is also required. Knowledge of the techniques, concepts, and applications of electrical engineering also adds to the breadth of understanding needed by all students in today’s multidisciplinary environment.

Prepared by: Robert Laibowitz

Date prepared: June 5, 2000.


EE E3041x Electrical Engineering Laboratory, I


Description: Topics keep pace with co-requisite courses, and include but are not limited to: use of measurement instruments; network theorems; RLC circuits; digital logic gates, programmable logic devices and basic applications.

Prerequisites: EE E3201 and E3910.

Texts: Lab Manual

Course Objectives: To familiarize the students with fundamental laboratory test instruments and basic procedures of electronic circuit analysis. Students learn to work in a team environment setting up and troubleshooting their experiments. The students are prepared to advance to a higher level of complexity in analysis of circuitry. The students are exposed to equipment that a classroom environment cannot provide.

Topics Covered: Test instruments, fundamental circuit laws and theorems, digital logic integrated circuits, operational amplifiers, transient response of first and second order circuits, sinusoidal analysis of RLC circuits, sequential logic circuits, programmable logic devices, and bicycle speedometer construction.

Class/Laboratory Schedule: Each laboratory section meets once a week for a three to four hour period. The students work in pairs and do a new experiment every week. There are 12 experiments in total, and there are 12 laboratory reports for the teams to submit; each is due two weeks from the completion date of the experiment.

Professional Component Contributions: Laboratory supplement to co-requisite courses.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

How Assessed: 12 Lab Reports (60%), Midterm and Laboratory Participation (40%).

Actions Taken to Improve Course: (not required by ABET)

Prepared by: Wen Wang

Date Prepared: June 21, 2000


 

EE E3042y Electrical Engineering Laboratory, II


Description: Continuation of E3041. MOS and bipolar transistors; operational amplifiers; feedback circuits; single stage amplifiers; A/D and D/A converters; computer-aided analysis.

Prerequisites: Prerequisites: EE E3041 and E3106. Co-requisite: EE E3301

Texts: Lab Manual

Course Objectives: To give the students hands-on laboratory experience in order to enhance their understanding of many important fundamental circuit components and their applications. Students not only learn characterization of these circuit components, but also application of the devices for useful circuits. Students also learn how to make circuits for digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital conversion.

Topics Covered: Non-ideal operational amplifier behavior, operational amplifier applications, feedback circuits, filters, diode characteristics and circuits, bipolar junction transistor (BJT) parameter measurement and biasing, BJT amplifiers, MOSFET parameter measurement and inverter circuits, transistor current sources and differential amplifiers, analog-to-digital conversion, digital-to-analog conversion.

Class/Laboratory Schedule: Each laboratory section meets once a week for a three to four hour period. There are 11 experiments that the students perform in teams of two. There is a new experiment each week, and two weeks are spent on analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversions. The students submit a total of 10 laboratory reports, each of which is due two weeks from the completion date of the experiment.

Professional Component Contributions: Laboratory supplement to co-requisite courses.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

How Assessed: 10 Lab Reports (60%), Midterm and Laboratory Participation (40%).

Actions Taken to Improve Course: (not required by ABET)

Prepared by: Wen Wang

Date Prepared: June 21, 2000


 

EE E3043x Electrical Engineering Laboratory, III


Description: Solid-state electronics. Fiber optics and communications. EM transmission and microwave techniques.

Prerequisites: EE E3106, E3401, and E3042.

Texts: Lab Manual

Course Objectives: Laboratory supplement to electromagnetics and solid-state devices. Through the weekly laboratory sessions, students get hands-on experience in solid-state devices, microwaves, and fiber-optics. By spending a few weeks on each of these topics, students become familiar with the design and troubleshooting of their experimental setups. Students learn how to present their scientific findings effectively by writing weekly laboratory reports.

Topics Covered: Electromagnetic waveguide theory; microwave equipment and techniques; dielectric resonator oscillator and PIN switch; microwave frequency, power, and attenuation measurements; measurement of the voltage standing wave ratio and reflection coefficient; estimation of material dielectric constant; antenna gain measurement; Doppler shift radar; diode I-V and C-V measurements; laser diode measurement; Hall effect; LED characteristics; optical fiber theory; optical signal sources; photodetectors as receivers for optical communications; measurement of the numerical aperture and attenuation of optical fibers; signal loss in fiber optic communications; data communications using a fiber optic system.

Class/Laboratory Schedule: Each laboratory section meets once a week for a three-hour period. There are 11 experimental setups in the laboratory. Each team of students spends one laboratory session at one of the setups, and then rotates to the next experimental setup the following week. There are 10 laboratory reports for the teams to submit; each is due two weeks from the completion date of the experiment.

Professional Component Contributions: To expose the students to the basics underlying current information technologies, and to teach them how these communication systems work.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

How Assessed: 10 Laboratory Reports, each is 10% of the student’s grade.

Actions Taken to Improve Course:

Prepared by: Wen Wang

Date Prepared: June 21, 2000


 

EE E3106x Solid-state Devices and Materials

Description: Crystal structure and energy band theory of solids. Carrier concentration and transport in semiconductors. P-n junction and junction transistors. Semiconductor surface and MOS transistors. Optical effects and optoelectronic devices.

Prerequisite: knowledge of differential equations.

Text: Pierret and Neudeck, Modular series on solid-state devices, Addison-Wesley, 1988, Volumes 1 through 4

Course objectives: To teach students the fundamental physical principles of solid-state electronics and silicon technology and motivate the device models used in circuit design.

Topics covered: Structure of solids: amorphous, polycrystalline crystalling. Crystalline solids: Bravais lattice, unit cells, basis, cubic structures, diamond structure.

Miller indices. Electrons in crystals: energy bands, effective mass, charge.

Density of states, Fermi-Dirac distribution function.

Donors and acceptors, compensation.

Electrons and holes, majority and minority carriers.

Charge neutrality, equilibrium carrier concentration.

Drift and diffusion: fundamental transport equations.

Recombination and generation.

Pn junctions: equilibrium and transport properties.

Metal-semiconductor contacts.

Bipolar junction transistors.

MOS capacitors and MOSFETs.

Basic silicon technology: oxidation, diffusion, ion implantation, epitaxy, photolithography.

Class/laboratory schedule: Two 1.5-hour lectures

Professional component contributions:

Relationship to Program Objectives

EE Objective A. This course is one of the more "physics"-oriented in the required EE program and "stresses" students in their understanding of differential equations, Maxwell's equations, and intuitions about quantum mechanics, transport theory, and electrostatics. It, therefore, provides a unique context for honing this aspect of the students’ intellectual maturity.

EE Objective B. This course unlies the fundamental physics of the EE discipline.

EE Objective C, D, E. No contribution.

How Assessed: (not required by ABET) Semester-end course evaluation.

Actions to be taken to improve course:

A lab is planned for the course, to be added sometime in the next three years. Students will fabricate a pn junction diode, MOS capacitor, and MOS transistor.

Prepared by: Ken Shepard

Date prepared: June 19, 2000


 

EE E3201 Circuit Analysis (3.5 points)

Description: A first on analysis of linear and their applications. Formulation of circuit equations. Network theorems. Transient response of first and second order circuits. Sinusoidal steady state analysis. Frequency response of linear circuits. Poles and zeros. Bode Plots.

Prerequisites: Math V1101 or V1105

Text:

Fall of 1999

W. H. Hayt, Jr. and J. E. Kemmerly: Engineering Circuit Analysis, fifth edition, McGraw-Hill, 1993.

Fall of 2000

A.B. Carlson: Circuits, Brooks/Cole, Thomson Learning, 2000.

Course Objectives: To make the students be able to analyze linear circuits in both systematic and intuitive way. To teach them the distinction in circuit behaviors assuming DC, sinusoid, damped sinusoid, and casual input. To introduce them system level concepts such as linearity, superposition, transfer function, and two-port modeling.

Topics covered: Electrical variable, circuit elements, circuit laws, special circuit connections, resistive circuits, capacitors, inductances. Circuit simplifications by using source combination, resistor combination and Thevenin-Norton equivalents. Circuit analysis with DC, sinusoid, dumped sinusoid inputs. Transient behavior of first order RC and RL, and second order RLC circuits. Introduction to the concept of transfer functions, poles-zeros and Bode-plots. Introduction to two-port representation of circuits.

Class/laboratory schedules: Two 75-minute lectures per week.

Professional Component Contribution: The students learn the systematic analysis of linear circuit with different input sources, as well as substantial amount of simplifying and intuitive techniques, which are essential on late circuit courses.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

EE Objective A: The mathematical background of the course includes elementary integral and differential calculus, first and second order linear differential equations and complex numbers. The background in physics includes the basic concepts of electricity.

EE Objective B: The course provides circuit simplifying and intuitive techniques, which are essential in later course in electrical engineering.

EE Objective C: There is no explicit teamwork in this course, although the students are encouraged to ask questions in class, visit the office hours, and ask questions and/or explanations about the homework solutions from the Teaching Assistant.

EE Objective E: Throughout the whole course the substantial difference between models and real devices are continuously emphasized. Also, the same problems are often solved with different techniques learned. In this way the course supports the objective of appreciating different approaches.


EE E3202y Signals and Systems, I

Description: Modeling, description, and classification of signals and systems. Continuous and discrete-time systems. Time domain analysis, differential equations, and convolution. Fourier series. Fourier and Laplace transforms. Frequency domain analysis, transfer functions. Amplitude and frequency modulation. Frequency response and Bode plots. Filtering. Stability and root locus. Use of modern mathematics and simulation software packages for signal and system analysis, such as MATLAB.

Prerequisites: EE E3201. Corequisite: Math. E1210.

Text: B.P. Lathi. Signal Processing and Linear Systems, Berkeley-Cambridge, 1998

Course Objectives: To provide a comprehensive introduction to the theory of signals and linear systems (the first of a two-course sequence), with emphasis on intuitive and heuristic understanding of the concepts and physical meaning of mathematical results leading to deeper appreciation and easier comprehension of the concepts.

Topics Covered: Classification of signals and systems, even and odd functions, input-output description of systems. Linear time-invariant continuous-time systems: impulse response, zero-input response, zero-state response, and stability. Signal representation by orthogonal signal set, trigonometric and complex exponential Fourier series, response to periodic inputs. Fourier Transforms and its properties, ideal and practical filters, amplitude modulation. Sampling theorem. Laplace Transform and its properties, solutions of Integro-Differential equations using the Laplace Transform, analysis of electrical networks: the transformed network, block diagrams.

Class/Laboratory Schedule: Two 1h 15min lectures each week and several 1h recitation sessions. Approximately ten homework assignments and three written tests (two midterms and one final exam).

Professional Component Contributions: This course is a fundamental prerequisite for all advanced knowledge in professional fields in the areas of communications, signal processing, and linear systems. It emphasizes the physical appreciation of concepts rather than mere mathematical manipulations of symbols. It provides the conceptual background to address all related problems of industrial relevance.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

  1. Use of complex analysis tools for the frequency-domain representation of continuous-time signals and systems
  2. Expertise in analyzing signals and systems is a basic required knowledge for any career in electrical engineering
  3. The course lectures are taught in a continuously interactive way in which students participate actively.
  4. Lectures include many examples that are solved using multiple approaches
  5. Recitation sessions include computer-aided demonstrations of the concepts that are taught during the lectures.

How Assessed: Two midterms: 25% each, Final 30%, Homework 20%

Prepared by: Dimitris Anastassiou

Date Prepared: May 10, 2000


 

EE E3203x Signals and Systems, II


Description: Continuation of the study of continuous-time signals and systems. State-space analysis of continuous-time systems. Sampling. Discrete-time systems and signals. Discrete-time domain analysis and convolution. Discrete Fourier transform. Z transform and its relation to the Laplace transform. State-space analysis of discrete-time systems.

Prerequisites: EE E3202. Corequisite: Appl. Math. E3101.

Texts: B. P. Lathi, Signal Processing and Linear Systems, Berkeley-Cambridge, 1998.

Course Objectives: To expand on the basic signals and systems knowledge provided in EE E3202. This is a new course, designed to be taken as part of a two-semester sequence in signals and systems. By introducing this sequence, we are able to cover adequately concepts, which previously had to be highly compressed into one semester. We are now able to spend much more time on discrete-time signals and systems and the state space. We are also able to focus more on the interface between continuous and discrete-time systems, and to introduce realistic applications such as filter design.

Topics Covered: Applications of the Laplace transform in filtering and control. State-space analysis of continuous-time systems. Sampling. Discrete-time systems and signals. Discrete-time domain analysis and convolution. Discrete Fourier transform. Z transform and its relation to the Laplace transform. State-space analysis of discrete-time systems.

Class/Laboratory Schedule: 3 lecture hours per week.

Professional Component Contributions: Students learn concepts of value in the analysis and design of engineering systems (not just electrical ones). The tools they learn to use are bread and butter in today's electrical engineering practice; for example, signal processing, the FFT, etc.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

EE Objective A: The course utilizes, and strengthens, the mathematical tools students have picked up in math courses, and shows how these can be applied to the analysis and design of engineering systems.

EE Objective B: The course provides a solid foundation in signals and systems, which is broad-based and appropriate for interdisciplinary work; see topics covered above.

EE Objectives C and D: These objectives are not directly addressed in this course.

EE Objective E: The course shows the value of theory, by making it possible for the students to solve relevant engineering problems, such as problems in control and filtering. A filter design project is used to illustrate the theory learned in the course.

How Assessed: (not required by ABET) Two questionnaires are given out: One at the end of the third week, and one at the end of the semester.

Actions Taken to Improve Course: (not require by ABET) This is a new course. With EE E3202, it forms a sequence, which has been designed to improve our students' education in circuits and systems. In comparison to our former, one-semester offering, this new sequence provides both more depth and more breadth.

Prepared by: Yannis Tsividis

Date Prepared: May 5, 2000.


EE E3301 Electronic Circuits I (3.5)

Description: Diode and transistor circuits, biasing techniques, MOSFET, ECL, TTL inverters, considerations of speed, powers, noise margin, and loading. Small-signal operation, single-ended and differential amplifiers.

Prerequisites: EE E1201 or the equivalent and #3201

Text:

Spring 1999

A. S. Sedra and K. C. Smith: Microelectronics Circuits, Fourth Edition, Oxford University Press, 1998.

Spring 2000

R.C. Jaeger: Microelectronic Circuit Design, McGraw-Hill, 1997.

Course Objectives: To teach the students how to deal with the basic nonlinear electronic devices: diodes, bipolar and field-effect transistors. To teach the students the use of diodes and transistors in basic inverters and amplifiers, to make the student be able to analyze circuits using simplified diode and transistor models.

Topic covered: Exponential and CVD models for diodes, simple circuits. Transport and Ebers-Moll for bipolar junction transistors, simplified models and modes of bipolar junction transistors. Quadratic modeling of field effect transistors. Biasing techniques. Basic amplifiers (NMOS, CMOS, ECL, TTL), voltage transfer characteristics, noise margins, dynamic and static power of inverters. Small signal modeling of diodes and transistors. Basic class-A amplifiers types and differential amplifiers. Calculation of small-signal parameters (input resistance, output resistance, voltage gain and current gain). Maximum input signal calculation to avoid output signal clipping.

Class/Laboratory Scheduler: Two 75-minute lectures per week.

Professional Component Contributions: the students learn the basic calculations and design techniques of circuits containing diodes and transistors. The students learn how to make distinction between linear and nonlinear circuits, and under what circumstances the linear techniques can be used circuit containing diodes and/or transistors.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

EE Objective A: The mathematical background of the course includes elementary integral and differential calculus, linear and certain nonlinear differential equations, power-series expansion, and complex numbers. The background in physics includes the operation of semiconductor devices.

EE Objective B: The course provides the general techniques of dealing with transistors and diodes using hand calculation or circuit simulators. This knowledge is indispensable in electrical engineering.

EE Objective C: There is no explicit teamwork in this course, although the students are encouraged to ask questions in class, visit during office hours, and consult about the homework solutions with the Teaching Assistant.

EE Objective D: this course is based on circuit analysis and related mathematics. It parallels with device physics courses, systems level courses, and laboratory exercises. Thus, the course supports the objective of developing a more perspective view of our profession.

EE Objective E: Using different abstraction levels of describing the operation of diodes and transistor depending on the type of the problem is one of the most important issue of this course. So, the course definitely supports the objective of appreciating different approaches.

 


 

EE E3302 Electronic Circuits II (3 points)

Description: Continuation of the study of analog circuits: review of frequency response, feedback, power circuits, amplifiers, multistage amplifiers, filters.

Prerequisites: EE E3301 and EE E3202

Text:

Fall of 1999

A.S. Sedra and K. C. Smith: Microelectronic Circuits, Fourth Edition, Oxford University Press, 1998.

Course Objectives: To teach the students more sophisticated transistor models. To make them able to analyze and design single and multistage amplifiers using hand analysis techniques and computer simulation. To introduce the students to the high frequency behavior and related trade offs in amplifiers design. To prepare the students to higher level analog IC design course.

Topics covered: Review of bias and small-signal calculations and basic class-A amplifiers types (common-emitter, common-base, and common-collector amplifiers). Design formulas and classification based on input resistance, output resistance, voltage gain and current gain. Fast analysis techniques using the source-absorption-rule and resistance-reflection-rule. Current mirrors. Differential amplifiers (common-mode and differential half circuits, common-mode and differential gains, and input resistances). Multistage amplifiers. The basic transistors-level operational amplifier. High frequency behavior of transistors. Frequency dependence of amplifier gain. Singe-pole modeling of amplifiers and related calculations.

Class/Laboratory Schedules: Two 75-minute lectures per week.

Professional Component Contribution: The students learn the basic tradeoffs in designing single stage amplifiers circuits. The students learn hoe to combine using hand analysis and circuit simulators to analyze amplifiers. The students learn how to improve amplifiers performance by using multistage and differential arrangements. The students learn the basics of high-frequency behavior of amplifiers.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

EE Objective A: This course is a continuation of EE3301. No extra knowledge in mathematics and physics are required.

EE Objective B: The course provide all the foundations, including hand analysis techniques and computer simulation skills, needed in more advanced course in analog electronic circuits.

EE Objective C: There is no explicit teamwork in this course, although the students are encouraged to ask questions in class, visit during office hours, and consult about the homework solutions with the Teaching Assistant.

EE Objective D: In this course the principles of electronic circuits are related to system level modeling and concepts. In this way this course supports the objective developing a more perspective view of our profession.

EE Objective E: By the end of this course the students will be able to look at the same circuit both at transistor and higher abstraction levels. So the objective of appreciating different approaches is supported.


EE E3401 Electromagnetics

Description: Basic field concepts. Interaction of time-varying electromagnetic fields. Field calculation of lumped circuit parameters. Transition from electrostatic to quasistatic and electromagnetic regimes. Transmission lines. Energy transfer, dissipation, and storage. Waveguides. Radiation.

Lecture: 3 hrs. Recitation: 1 hr. Credits: 4

Prerequisites: basic physics and mathematics courses

Text: P. Diament, Dynamic Electromagnetics, Prentice Hall, 2000

Course objectives: To impart basic concepts of distributed systems and electromagnetic field interactions. Time-varying fields are treated throughout. The mathematics is kept simple, at the level of elementary integration (no special functions of mathematical analysis). High-frequency phenomena are approached via quasistatic analysis, emphasizing deviations from the results of circuit theory and allowing for engineering approximations when exact analysis is elusive. Transmission lines and wave propagation are the focus, both transient and steady state. They illustrate time delay, reflections, standing waves, matching procedures, effects of mismatch, measurement techniques, and power transfer. Electric and magnetic fields are treated on a par. Interpretations are stressed.

Topics covered: Field concept. Electric field. Flux of vector field. Gauss’s law. Coulomb’s law. Superposition. Magnetic field. Magnetomotive force. Ampère’s law. Current. Conservation of charge. Current element. Biot-Savart law. Electromotive force. Ohm’s law. Power density. Faraday-Maxwell law. Ampère-Maxwell law. Moving charge. Boundary conditions. Quasistatic analysis. Transmission lines. Matched line. Waves. Mismatched line. Incident and reflected waves. Sinusoidal steady state. Complex exponentials. Power transfer. Standing waves. Impedance measurements. Poynting theorem. Coaxial line. General transmission line equations and solutions. Waveguides. Separation of variables. Radiation from current element.

Class schedule: Three one-hour lectures per week, plus choice of two recitation sections.

Professional component contributions: Students learn how distributed systems differ from lumped ones and what the limitations of circuit analysis are. They are provided with basic knowledge of electromagnetic fields and of wave propagation, including action at a distance and after a delay. They learn how to apply Maxwell’s equations and how high-frequency behavior differs from circuit action at low frequencies.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

EE objective A: This is a basic science and mathematics course and teaches how to solve electrical engineering problems in distributed systems.

EE objective B: This is the only required course in electromagnetics for all electrical engineering students; it prepares them for more advanced elective coursework in electromagnetics and in the physical side of electrical engineering.

EE objective C: The recitations provide a modicum of opportunity to communicate with the teaching assistant and participate in problem-solving situations.

EE objective E: A number of examples illustrate design approaches and techniques.

Assessments: Two quizzes and a final examination assess student progress; homework performance counts toward the grade. Students are asked to complete course evaluation questionnaires.

Actions taken to improve course: The instructor wrote a textbook specifically for this course, so students can follow the lectures with collateral reading.

Prepared by: Paul Diament

Date prepared: May 9, 2000


EE-ME E3601 Classical Control Systems

Fall Semester 1999

1998-1999 Catalog Data: EE-ME E3601. Classical control systems. 3pts. Professor Longman. Prerequisite: ordinary differential equations. Analysis and design of feedback control systems. Transfer functions, block diagrams, proportional, rate, and integral controllers, hardware implementation. Routh stability criterion, root locus, Bode and Nyquist plots, compensation techniques.

Textbook: Phillips and Harbor, Classical Control Systems, Prentice Hall

Reference: None

Coordinator: Richard W. Longman, Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Prerequisite by Topics

Solution of nth order linear differential equations

Topics:

1. Solution of ODE’s

2. Response of 1st and 2nd order systems

3. Laplace transforms

4. Transfer functions, block diagrams

5. Routh criterion

6. PID control

7. Root locus

8 Bode and Nyquist

Evaluations:

1. Weekly homework assignments

2. Midterm examination (1 hour)

3. Final examination (3 hours)

Prepared by: R. W. Longman, Professor

Signature April 2000


SIEO W3658 Probability

Note: This course is listed in the IEOR Department but is taught by an EE professor and is required in the undergraduate EE program.

Description: Fundamentals of probability theory. Distributions of one or more random variables. Moments. Generating functions. Law of large numbers and central limit theorem.

Lecture: 3 hrs. Credits: 3

Prerequisites: Calculus.

Text: S. Ross, A First Course in Probability, Prentice Hall, 1998; 5th ed.

Course objectives: To impart the principles and concepts of elementary probability theory. To teach how to deal with nondeterministic systems and how to evaluate the probability of events and outcomes governed by random processes. To familiarize students with the basic probability distributions and elementary concepts of statistics.

Topics covered: Introduction – Why learn probability? Algebra of events; inadequate definitions of probability. Combinatorial analysis; fundamental principle. Number of selections, ordered or not, with or without replacement. Handling large numbers: inhaling a celebrity molecule; Stirling’s formula. Axioms of probability theory. Random variables, discrete and continuous. Probability function, probability density function; cumulative distribution function. Normal distribution. Measures of random variables. Functions of random variables: cdf and pdf methods. Joint density functions. Independent events; independent random variables. Expected values; averages; variances; gamma function. Characteristic function of a random variable. Chebyshev inequality; central limit theorem; law of large numbers. Correlation; covariance, correlation coefficient. Probability and characteristic functions for discrete variables. Conditional probability; Bayes formula. Bernoulli trials; binomial distribution. Poisson distribution; photoelectron emission. Joint probability function for discrete variables. Random number of trials. Continuous to noncontinuous transformations. Random events conditioned on other random events. Statistical inference; biased and unbiased estimators. Confidence intervals. Hypothesis testing; decision theory.

Class schedule: Three one-hour lectures per week.

Professional component contributions: Students learn how to deal with randomness in engineering problems. They learn how to apply probabilistic concepts in a variety of applications, for example in photoelectron emission. They are introduced to the use of averages and deviations from average values and to statistical estimators and hypothesis testing.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

EE objective A: This is a basic science and mathematics course and teaches how to solve electrical engineering problems involving randomness and nondeterministic systems.

EE objective B: This course prepares students for work in a host of engineering and scientific disciplines. It prepares them for further work in communications, among many other areas.

EE objective E: The design of experiments to test hypotheses and make decisions is covered, on a rudimentary basis.

Assessments: A midterm and a final examination assess student progress; homework performance counts toward the grade. Students are asked to complete course evaluation questionnaires.

Actions taken to improve course: The instructor supplements the topics covered in the textbook with cognate material that is not in the text, particularly on dealing with large numbers and including examples of general interest, beyond those dealt with in the book.

Prepared by: Paul Diament

Date prepared: May 9, 2000


EE E3701x Introduction to Communication Systems and Networks

Description: Basics of point-to-point, primarily digital, physical-layer communications with sampling, quantization, multiplexing, and modulation theory and design. Elements of local area networks and packet communication at the network services layers are presented and analyzed.

Prerequisites: ELEN E3202, SIEO W3658 (co-requisite)

Text: Information Transmission, Modulation, and Noise M. Schwartz, McGraw-Hill, 1990.

Course Objectives: To teach the students the basic physical-layer engineering of communication systems from pulse modulation techniques to the design of small (local area) networks; to provide the students with design specifications of existing (e.g., The DSn formats, the SONET standard, etc.); and finally, to develop analytical skills in relevant areas of applied mathematics, especially transform methods in the spectral analysis of systems, and probabilistic traffic analysis in simple network topologies.

Topics covered: PCM and DPCM systems, AM and FM systems, and high frequency PSK, FSK, and OOK modulation. Multiplexing formats, bit stuffing techniques. The Nyquist sampling theorem. Logarithmic quantization techniques and companding. Wave shaping techniques. Multisymbol signaling, QAM, and demodulation/detection. Modem design. LAN standards, packet switching. LAN performance analysis, statistical multiplexing.

Class schedule: 2 75-minute lectures

Professional Component Contributions: Students are introduced to the functions of international standards bodies. Political issues of the field are noted where appropriate. Especially in the case of fundamentals, the student is given historical perspectives from the point of view of outstanding scientists as well as industrial laboratories and governmental R&D agencies most responsible for today's communications systems. Illustrative real-life systems and design problems are brough out repeatedly in the course.

EE Objective A: with that necessary first step towards a strong foundation in the communication sciences and applied mathematics which will empower them to recognize, formulate, and solve significant electrical engineering problems. The student will be fully prepared to move on to courses in the fundamentals of information theory, noise processes, and coding theory.

EE Objective B: The course covers the design specifications of existing systems, it teaches them the parlance and the common wisdom of the field, and it prepares them for the real world in the sense of the professional component contributions listed above.

EE Objective C: The course is not designed specifically to address this objective, but it is noteworthy that in the second half of the term, students are divided up into groups (based on their performance in the first half) for the purposes of team-organized homework assignments.

EE Objective D: This objective is not fully applicable to this course. However, as noted it comments on political and social issues reflecting the impact of revolutionary technological change in the communications field.

EE Objective E: This course offers superb examples of the relationship between theory and practice. Fourier-integral and linear-system theory parlay directly into the design of communications circuits and systems. Contributions to design experience are made by the problem sets in which the student is often asked to produce a system out of given building blocks to meet given specifications. Circuits and systems.

Actions taken to improve the course: Staying abreast of technology is a prime requirement in the changing design of this course. For example, recently, further emphasis on optical communications was needed to reflect engineering advance reflect engineering advances.

 

Prepared by: Prof. Edward Coffman


EE E3910x Elements of Digital Systems


Description: Theory of digital systems. Digital coding of information. Study of combinational and sequential system design. Finite-state machines. Microcode. Computer arithmetic. Microprocessors.

Prerequisites: Knowledge of computer programming

Text: M. M. Mano and C. R. Kime, Logic and Computer Design Fundamentals, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2000.

Course Objectives: To learn basic techniques for designing low to medium complexity digital systems. It covers the fundamental theory and techniques for designing combinational (memoryless) and sequential (with memory) digital circuits, as well as their use in systems of practical interest. These circuits form the basis of all digital systems, from computers to digitally controlled microwave ovens to traffic lights. The material, in conjuction with the follow-up course "Microprocessor Laboratory" prepares students for more advanced topics such as Computer Architecture, VLSI Circuits, VLSI Design, and Operating Systems.

Topics Covered: Basic concepts: numbering systems, Boolean algebra, Karnaugh map simplification and manipulation, basic gates (AND, OR, etc.). Digital circuits and their design methodologies: analysis and design of combinational circuits (examples include decoders, encoders, multiplexers, adders/subtractors, multipliers), latches and flip-flops, analysis of sequential circuits using state tables and state transition diagrams, design of sequential circuits using D and JK flip-flops, registers, shift registers, ripple counter, synchronous binary counters, RAM, PLA and PAL. Computer architecture: datapaths and register transfer operations, multiplexer and bus-based transfer, ALU, shifter, control word, pipelining, the control unit, algorithmic state machines, hardwired and microprogrammed control, instruction set architecture.

Class/Laboratory Schedule: Two 1-hour 15-minute lectures per week.

Professional Component Contributions: This is the first course that exposes students to the underlying methodology of design and analysis of digital circuits of small to medium complexity, as well as the fundamentals of computer architecture. Lack of significant prerequisite requirements as well as its very strong system design component make it a very appealing course. As most students have been involved in analysis (rather than design) at this point in their studies, this course plays an instrumental role in strenghtening their self-confidence in design and engineering decision-making. The course also has a central role in establishing the foundation on which more advanced courses in computers and digital systems design are based (microprocessor lab, VLSI circuits and VLSI design lab, computer hardware design, etc.).

Relationship to Program Objectives:

EE Objective A: The course provide an impressive example of a domain where seemingly unrelated, abstract mathematics (Boolean algebra) has had a profound impact on very applied engineering design. For many students this strengthens their determination to build a solid theoretical (math/physics) foundation, as the link between the two becomes apparent.

EE Objective B: The course provides the core tools for understanding the operation of digital circuits. Given the proliferation of digital technology in all aspects of engineering and our everyday life, this knowledge is absolutely essential for any practicing electrical and computer engineer. The course emphasizes key methodologies, rather than the use of the latest available technology, so that students are well-prepared to face the extremely fast-paced world of digital systems. Furthermore, use of these methodologies can be easily targeted to different application domains (e.g., digital signal processors, embedded microcontrollers, etc.) at the students’ initiative. The course also introduces the use of computer-aided design and analysis, so that students are well-prepared for the design methodologies used by the commercial sector.

EE Objective C: Although the course does not involve a term project or a team design work, it does introduce students to modular design and the need to partition larger systems into smaller ones with well-defined interfaces. The follow-up courses of microprocessor laboratory and/or computer hardware design apply this principles extensively in team-based and extensive design work.

EE Objective D: Ethical issues are addressed as part of the normal academic process. However, we also discuss issues related to reverse engineering of designs, and the related patent and copyright issues. Students get a basic overview of the provisions of the law in terms of intellectual property protection for engineering designs and products.

EE Objective E: This course is the first opportunity for students to exercise creative design strategies and to really bring in their own imagination to bear in their work. Design is part of the course from its very beginning (e.g., different choices in implementing simple combinational circuits), and very much encouraged in working out homework solutions throughout the semester. The students have the opportunity to do several small designs of digital systems, understand relevant tradeoffs, and make appropriate judgement on how to resolve them.

How Assessed: (not required by ABET) A questionnaire is given out after the first three to four weeks of the course, and another one is given at the end of the course. The first one is used only by the instructor in order to ensure that the pace and level of detail of the course matches is appropriate, whereas the second one is used by the instructor and the school as an overall evaluation of the course and the instructor.

Actions Taken to Improve Course: (not required by ABET) The textbook has been changed to better reflect the topics covered in the lectures. In addition, computer-aided design tools are being introduced in the course in order to better prepare students to work in real-life design environments.

Prepared by: Alexandros Eleftheriadis

Date Prepared: June 22, 2000.


 

EE E3940y Microprocessor Laboratory


Description: Z80 microprocessor architecture, programming and design laboratory. Z80 assembly and machine languages. I/O and interfacing. Weekly laboratory sessions and term project on design of a microprocessor-based system.

Prerequisites: Prerequisite: knowledge of computer programming. Corequisite: EE E3910 or Comp. Sci. W3843, or the equivalent.

Texts:

  • The Z80 Microprocessor: Architecture, Programming and Design, Ramesh Gaonkar, Prentice Hall, 1994.
  • Micro-Trainer Manual, C. Strangio, CAMI Research, 1984.
  • Laboratory Experiments for the Micro-Trainer, 1986, C. Strangio, CAMI Research, 1984.
  • ZAD Z80 Cross-Developed System from the Micro-Trainer, CAMI Research, 1989

Course Objectives: To teach microprocessor architecture, programming and IO and interfacing circuits. Through classroom lectures and weekly laboratory assignments students get hands on experience with design, implementation and integration problems. Weekly laboratories provided a structured and progressively more challenging set of problems that include understanding the internal architecture of the Z80, building IO circuits to interface to a variety of electro-mechanical devices and developing term projects. Learn in a team environment and prepare for each assignment in advance, keep technical notebooks; present problems, trouble shooting using measurement devices and provide technical solutions.

Topics Covered: Z-80 and uP architecture; Accumulator flags and meanings; Address decoding (I/O and memory); Z-80 pins and relation to architecture; Processing steps (fetch, decode...); Introduction to stacks and subroutines; Machine Cycles and Bus Timings; Introduction to Z-80 assembly language; Peripheral devices and I/O structures - transmission line effects on buses; Programmable peripheral devices. Z-80 Programmable I/O (PIO), modes, pins and programming; signal levels on bus, and programming sample program; Interrupts and programming (examples), indirect interrupts, vectored, etc. real issues in interrupts (e.g. priorities), Direct Memory Access DMA (types, sequence, uses); Z8410 DMA Controller (flow chart); Interfacing I/O devices (hardware examples); Memory mapped I/O devices; A/D conversion for lab purposes; Introduce external timer/counter concept; Memory Mapped I/O; Work through assembler program to check a cyclical redundancy code (CRC) for a communications link; Counter/Timer Circuit (CTC) modes, programming and examples - pin diagram to review interfacing; Control work structure Serial I/O and Data Communication; Serial I/O concepts, interface requirements, formats (sync, direction, speed), error detection and correction (parity, CRC, LRC); Serial I/O standards (RS-232C).

Class/Laboratory Schedule:

One two hour lecture and three hour laboratory each week. Lecture covers fundamentals and provides context for the laboratory session. Each week a new concept taught in the classroom is backed up with hands on experience in the laboratory. Students work in small teams usually 2-4 in size. Weekly class assignments are given that reinforce the theoretical aspects of the course. Weekly preparation is essential to complete laboratory assignment. Plans for the weekly labs and student note books are used to complete the lab and used as a basis to write up weekly reports. Projects start in the last 6 weeks of the semester. Three project milestones are provided: design, implementation and demonstration. Project teams work together to solve problems that incorporate hardware and software design using the Z80 kits and a wide variety of electro mechanical devices, algorithmic techniques and applications.

Professional Component Contributions:

Students learn how to use laboratory equipment and work in teams to solve problems using microprocessor trainer kits. Basic low level programming and IO interfacing skills are developed. Students learn to present their results in and organized fashion both in writing and presentation. Trouble shooting skills are developed for resolving software and hardware integration issues. A class project promotes team-work and group problem solving. The project also emphasizes the issue of economics in design choice when students are faced with multiple solutions to the project problem space. Safety and ethical issues are discussed in the laboratory.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

  • EE Object A: Students use engineering foundations of circuit design, computer architecture and computer programming to solve as set of real world problems in the laboratory.
  • EE Object B: Students have to provide solutions that are economical in design, solve problems at the software/hardware interface and identify and solve integration problems.
  • EE Object C: Students work in teams to solve a set of increasingly complex problems in a limited time. Teams have to prepare solutions in advance collectively resolving any design and implementation issues. Presentation of project ideas, possible solutions and final presentation of projects on project day are open to the class, faculty and friends for input. Students have to defend their team decision making and choices during the design and implementation milestones.
  • EE Object D: Projects provide an opportunity to appreciate a wide variety of solutions that include computer hardware and software design, and teamwork. Teams operate as small design groups providing a range of different approaches to the problems set and term project challenges. Ethical, safety and teamwork issues are discussed where students take responsibility for project and coursework accountability by maintaining a record in their laboratory notebooks.
  • EE Object E: Students obtain first class skills at developing solutions to complex problems that include electrical engineering and computing foundations in the context of a design experience. Students appreciate the development life cycle by defining a problem, identifying the pros and cons of the solution space through design, implementation and integration. Students work on team projects, gain skills at working together effectively and present their ideas and project at a project day open to the faculty and school.

How Assessed: Midterm (30%); Lab Reports (25%); Project report and oral (25% / 5%); Homework and quiz (10% / 5%).

Actions Taken to Improve Course: A new laboratory was build in 1999 called iLab (see: http://www.ee.columbia.edu/iLab/). The iLab includes 30 new PCs and networking equipment funded by the Intel Corporation and the Engineering School.

Prepared by: Andrew T. Campbell

Date Prepared: 3 May 2000


EE E4301 Introduction to Semiconductor Devices

 

Description: Semiconductor physics. Carrier injection and recombination. P-n junction and diodes: Schottky barrier and heterojunctions, solar cells and light-emitting diodes. Junction and MOS field-effect transistors, bipolar transistors. Tunneling and charge-transfer devices.

Prerequisite: EE E3106

Text: Muller and Kamins, Device Electronics for Integrated Circuits, Wiley.

Course objectives: To teach students the fundamental physical principles of solid-state electronics and silicon technology and motivate the device models used in circuit design.

Topics covered: Structure of solids: amorphous, polycrystalline crystalling. Crystalline solids: Bravais lattice, unit cells, basis, cubic structures, diamond structure. Miller indices. Electrons in crystals: energy bands, effective mass, charge. Density of states, Fermi-Dirac distribution function. Donors and acceptors, compensation. Electrons and holes, majority and minority carriers. Charge neutrality, equilibrium carrier concentration. Drift and diffusion: fundamental transport equations. Recombination and generation. Pn junctions: equilibrium and transport properties. Metal-semiconductor contacts. Bipolar junction transistors. MOS capacitors and MOSFETs. Basic silicon technology: oxidation, diffusion, ion implantation, epitaxy, photolithography.

Class/laboratory schedule: Two 1.5-hour lectures

Professional component contributions:

Relationship to Program Objectives

EE Objective A. This course is one of the more "physics"-oriented in the required EE program and "stresses" students in their understanding of differential equations, Maxwell's equations, and intuitions about quantum mechanics, transport theory, and electrostatics. It, therefore, provides a unique context for honing this aspect of the students' intellectual maturity.

EE Objective B. This course unlies the fundamental physics of the EE discipline.

EE Objective C, D. No contribution.

EE Objective E. Class concludes with each student giving an oral presentation on an advanced device topic based on a literature survey.

How Assessed: (not required by ABET) Semester-end course evaluation.

Prepared by: Prof. Ken Shepard


EE E4303 Analog Integrated Circuit Design

Description: Integrated circuit device characteristics and models; IC operational amplifier analysis and design; feedback amplifiers, stability and frequency compensation techniques; noise, frequency selective amplifiers. Computer-aided analysis techniques are used extensively.

Prerequisites: EE E3301 (Electronic Circuits).

Texts: Paul R. Gray and Robert G. Meyer "Analysis and Design of Analog Integrated Circuits," Wiley, third Edition. Supplemented by slides prepared for the occasion.

Course Objectives: To cover basic and more advanced aspects of analog integrated circuit design through a detailed discussion of how general-purpose operational amplifiers are designed. To identify the (multiple-nested) control-system nature of analog circuits; to specify the requirements thereto; and to illustrate how the system can be made stable. To enhance the student’s understanding and appreciation of the many tradeoffs that are involved when designing analog circuits. To introduce the student to real-world design objectives, such as good circuit robustness, low power consumption, low production cost, etc. Through completing a design project, let the student experience that there generally is no one optimal solution.

Topics Covered: physical behavior/properties of CMOS and bipolar-junction transistors; review of the small-signal concept; review of single-transistor amplifiers; the use of active loads, cascades, and cascades to increase the low-frequency gain; robust biasing techniques; commonmode feedback; Nyquist’s stability criterion; how to obtain a dominating-pole frequency response; design and compensation of multi-stage opamps; power efficiency; class-AB output stages; general theory for negative-feedback systems.

Class/Laboratory Schedule: two 75 min. lectures every week. Homework and/or project work is assigned every week.

Professional Component Contributions: A through understanding of each topic covered is important for the daily work of any engineer practicing design of integrated analog circuits. Each pair of students is assigned a unique design project selected by them (accommodating their interests to the extent possible) during a meeting with the instructor. The design project emphasizes teamwork, and all will expose them to the many aspects of circuit design. The students use the CADENCE design environment, which is the current industry standard. The project is completed by writing a report similar to a short paper in an IEEE Journal.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

  • EE Objective A: control theory is covered in some detail, illustrating how and when analog integrated circuits can be modeled accurately by linear mathematical models. The proof for Nyquist’s stability criterion was provided to avoid the sense of "black magic" that may result from providing only the result and showing how to use it. Mason’s rule from graph theory was used as a simple way to solve linear algebraic equations and to emphasize the negative-feedback structure of most analog circuits.
  • EE Objective B: The opamp is a building block used extensively in more and more analog circuits, such as amplifiers, switched-capacitor circuits, gm-C filters, etc. Although any particular design approach is useful; only for as long as the technology does not change radically (which it tends to do every 2-5 years), the emphasized underlying philosophy is universally valid, and will serve them well for many years to come. Te students will probably use the CADENCE software in their professional careers.
  • EE Objective C: Teamwork is instrumental for the design projects. Different design projects were assigned to the individual groups, and the students were encouraged to help each other, also across the groups. Communication in writing was emphasized by requiring that the report be written in the same way as they would write an IEEE paper.
  • EE Objective D: Ready-made solutions were not offered, but the fundamental relationships and the need for making compromises as an integral part of the design procedure was explained thoroughly. Common sense was emphasized as the most important tool to battle inaccurate transistor models, poor control of electrical parameters, and many other practical problems.
  • EE Objective E: The design project gives the students hands-on experience. They design circuits in a modern sub-micron technology facing all the problems that inherently involves, including poor transistor models, low supply voltage, etc.

Actions Taken to Improve Course: increases emphasis on real-work problems. New course material was developed and will recompiled for each year until ultimately the course takes a top-down approach to the subject matter and from the very beginning used computer simulations to implement learning-by-doing.

Prepared by: Jasper Steensgaard


E.E. E4304x Analog Circuits and Systems in VLSI


Description:
The course deals with the analysis and design of switched-capacitor circuits, continuous-time filters, and Nyquist-rate and over-sampling data converters. The emphasis will be at the opamp level and above; however, transistor-level knowledge is required. Where possible, the application of these VLSI systems will be introduced. There will be weekly homework assignments as well as an extensive design project.

Prerequisites: ELEN E3301 (Electronic Circuits). Knowledge of discrete-time signal processing and continuous-time filters is desirable.

Text: David Johns and Ken Martin, "Analog Integrated Circuit Design," John Wiley and Sons.

Course Objectives: make the students familiar with circuit techniques used frequently in modern large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits. Ultimately, the students will be able to evaluate when analog discrete-time and/or continuous-time circuits and systems are preferable to a mixed-mode solution involving data conversion and digital signal processing.

Topics Covered: discrete-time and continuous-time signals and systems, particularly including switched-capacitor circuits and continuous-time filters. Preferred topologies and non-ideal effects of said circuits. Overview of data converter types and their advantages/disadvantages in terms of complexity, performance, cost, and robustness.

Class Schedule: One 2-hour 40-minutes lecture per week.

Professional Component Contributions: Students obtain insight in the tradeoffs involved in the design on analog VLSI circuits. Specific design issues and circuit tricks are covered in detail to enable the students to design and identify shortcomings of analog signal-processing circuits. A design project exposes the students to the complexity involved in designing a successful circuit.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

EE Objective A: The material and the homework problems involves making frequent transitions between the time and frequency domains. The students are thereby trained in using the Fourier and other transformations, complex numbers, and general mathematical techniques. The discussion of several effects, e.g., charge injection, involves application of logic and fundamental physical principles.

EE Objective B: The course concerns primarily circuit and systems that are vital for modern analog signal-processing circuits, and therefore contributes significantly to the students’ understanding and appreciation of electrical engineering and its foundation.

EE Objective C: The design projects train the students in effective communication (by writing a technical report) and teamwork.

EE Objective D: system-level considerations and evaluations expose and train the students in optimizing a system within a set a boundary conditions. Cost, reliability, power consumption, etc., are examples of parameters that are considered again and again.

EE Objective E: The extensive design project provides an opportunity for the students to try out on their own not only the techniques taught in this class, but a broad range of tools and techniques taught in the prerequisite classes.

Prepared by: Jesper Steensgaard

Date Prepared: October 11, 2000.


E.E. E4306x Communication Circuits


Description: Principles of electronic circuits used in the generation, transmission, and reception of signal waveforms. Nonlinearity and distortion; power amplifiers; tuned amplifiers; oscillators; multipliers and mixers; modulators and demodulators; phase-locked loops. An extensive design project is an integral part of the course.

Prerequisite: E.E. E3302.

Text: Pederson and Mayaram, Analog Integrated Circuits for Communication, Kluwer, 1991.

Course Objectives: To teach students the fundamentals behind several types of communication circuits, so that they can analyze, simulate, and design such circuits. Emphasis is placed on RF circuits used in wireless telecommunications.

Topics Covered: Review of single-transistor and differential stages. Harmonic, intermodulation, and cross-modulation distortion. Power amplifier stages. Resonant circuits and transformers. Single-stage and multi-stage RF amplifiers. Neutralization. Impedance matching. Oscillator fundamentals. The Van der Pol oscillator. Oscillator circuit types. Colpitts oscillators. Crystal oscillators. Relaxation oscillators. Mixers. AM and FM modulators and demodulators. Phase-locked loops.

Class Schedule: One two-hour lecture per week.

Professional Component Contributions: Most of the circuits discussed in this course are realistic examples of what is done in the industry. To motivate students, William Hewlett's Master's Thesis is handed out at the beginning of the semester; it describes an oscillator which became Hewlett-Packard's first product.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

EE Objective A: Although this is not a basic sciences or mathematics course, it uses mathematics (e.g., perhaps no other course makes such extensive use of Fourier analysis to describe the performance of real circuits; nonlinear differential equations are used to describe the Van der Pol equation; etc.). The mathematical tools used here can find applications in other areas the students are likely to encounter.

EE Objective B: This is the only undergraduate course that exposes students to nonlinear circuits. The approaches they see here can be used in a variety of situations involving nonlinear systems. The techniques they learn are immediately useful in the design of circuits for wireless applications.

EE Objective C: Students are exposed to engineering teamwork (albeit not interdisciplinary) by working in pairs on the design project.

EE Objective D: This objective is not addressed in this course.

EE Objective E: The course involves a design project that helps tie together theory and practice. The design project varies from offering to offering, but it is typically an RF amplifier or receiver. In one offering, students were also given the option of making the circuit they designed and testing it in the laboratory, for extra credit.

How Assessed: A questionnaire is given out after the first three weeks, and another one at the end of the course.

Prepared by: Yannis Tsividis

Date Prepared: October 10, 2000.


EE E4321x VLSI Circuits


Description: EE E3301, E3910, and E3106. Design and analysis of high speed logic and memory. Digital CMOS and BiCMOS device modeling. Integrated circuit fabrication and layout. Interconnect and parasitic elements. Static and dynamic techniques. Worst-case design. Heat removal and I/O. Yield and circuit reliability. Logic gates, pass logic, latches, PLAs, ROMs, RAMs, receivers, drivers, repeaters, sense amplifiers.

Prerequisites: EE E3301, E3910, and E3106.

Text: Rabaey, Digital Integrated Circuits: A Design Perspective, Prentice-Hall.

Course objectives: To teach students the fundamental principles of digital CMOS integrated circuit design. The course includes a mini-design project completed in teams of two students.

Topics covered: Review of semiconductor device physics and modeling. VLSI fabrication technology. Design rules. Stick diagrams, layout planning, and area estimation. CMOS inverter. Static and dynamic CMOS combinational logic gates. Simple delay models (RC) for CMOS gates. Latches and clocking.

Datapath functional units (adders, shifter, multipliers).

Control logic structures (PLAs, multi-level logic implementations, synthesis and place-and-route CAD).

MOS memories. Global interconnect modeling. Structured layout design

Design for testability. Packaging. I/O design.

Class/laboratory schedule: Two 1.5-hour lectures. Scheduled design lab time.

Professional component contributions:

Relationship to Program Objectives

EE Objective A. This is an applied course, but stresses the foundations of fundamental principles.

EE Objective B. This course is deeply practical. The goal is to produce students with good, hands-on knowledge of integrated circuit design.

EE Objective C. Achieved through the mini-design project and group work.

EE Objective D. No contribution.

EE Objective E. Achieved through the mini-design project and group work.

How Assessed: (not required by ABET) Semester-end course evaluation.

Prepared by: Ken Shepard

Date prepared: June 19, 2000


EE E4332 VLSI Design Lab


Description: Prerequisite: EE E4321 or E4304. Design of a large scale, digital, or analog MOS integrated circuit. Project circuits may be fabricated for those who wish to test them during the following term. Lectures cover use of computer-aided design tools and study of some sample VLSI circuits.

Prerequisite: EE E4321 or E4304.

Text: None.

Course objectives: Beginning with Spring, 2000, the course has been restructured so that the class works together as a team to develop and build a complex integrated circuit chip. In Spring, 2000, the class designed and built a single-chip MP3 player, including an on-chip DSP core, SRAMs, and DACs. The class was also responsible for developing the software for the chip. The class divides into teams, each responsible for delivering one piece of the chip.

The class utilizes the latest in industrial CAD tools using a leading-edge process technology. A fraction of the class remains for the following semester to test the fabricated chip.

Topic covered: The topics covered in the lectures will vary according to the project being pursued that year. We discuss overall global chip design issues such as clocking, power, floorplanning. For the MP3 player project, we also covered the MP3 decoding algorithms, DSP architectures, multiplier circuits, SRAMs, and data conversion.

Class/laboratory schedule: The class meets for a two-hour lecture once a week for the first half of the semester. After that, the class meets in groups weekly with the instructor to track problems and chart progress.

Relationship to program objectives:

EE Objective A. This is an applied course, but stresses the foundations of fundamental principles.

EE Objective B. This course is deeply practical. The goal is to produce students with good, hands-on knowledge of integrated circuit design.

EE Objective C. This is a course designed to teach students how real engineering is done in industry. Each student gives two oral presentations, a design review mid-semester and an end-of-the-semester final presentation.

EE Objective D. IEEE Code of Ethics displayed in lab. Discussions in class of intellectual property issues.

EE Objective E. This course is part of our senior-year design offerings.

Prepared by: Ken Shepard

Data prepared: June 19, 2000


EE E4340 Computer Hardware Design

Description: Recommended preparation: Practical aspects of computer hardware design through the implementation, simulation, and prototyping of a PDP-8 processor. High-level and assembly languages, I/O, interrupts, datapath and control design, pipelining, busses, memory architecture. Programmable logic and hardware prototyping with FPGAs. Fundamentals of VHDL for register-transfer level design. Testing and validation of hardware. Hands-on use of industry CAD tools for simulation and synthesis

Prerequisites: EE E3910 or Comp. Sci. W3823 and W3824.

Text: None

Course objectives: To teach students the practical issues of digital systems design at the register-transfer level through the design and implementation of a complete working computer (a PDP8).

Topics covered: Instruction set architectures. PDP/8 architecture.

Design methodology and processes. Cost issues. ASM charting and state machine design. Fundamentals of VHDL. Datapath design and the requirements of the instruction set. Datapath elements. PDP/8 datapath.

Buses and I/O system design. Asynchronous communication discipline. UARTs.

Control logic design. Hardwired control, microcode, millicode. Control logic for the PDP/8. Testing and validation of hardware. Logic families and programmable logic. FPGAs. Power, timing, noise issues in digital design. Performance. CPI and cycle time. Pipelining. Multiprocessors.

Class/laboratory schedule: Two 1.5-hour lectures, one 3-hour lab weekly.


EE E4401 Wave Transmission and Fiber Optics

Description: Waves and Maxwell’s equations. Field energetics, dispersion, complex power. Waves in dielectrics and in conductors. Reflection and refraction. Oblique incidence and total internal reflection. Transmission lines and conducting waveguides. Planar and circular dielectric waveguides; integrated optics and optical fibers. Hybrid and LP modes. Graded-index fibers. Mode coupling; wave launching.

Lecture: 3 hrs. Credits: 3

Prerequisites: EE E3401 (Electromagnetics) or the equivalent.

Text: P. Diament, Wave Transmission and Fiber Optics, Macmillan, 1990

Course objectives: To inculcate basic concepts of guided waves and electromagnetic field and energy properties, culminating in principles of integrated optics and of fiber optics. Starting from the concept of a wave and Maxwell’s equations, field energetics and dispersive properties are developed. Interpretations of complex fields and of phase, group, and energy velocities are discussed. Waves in insulators and in conductors are contrasted. Reflection and transmission at interfaces, both normal and oblique, are treated. The crucial concept of total internal reflection is covered in depth. Transmission lines are reviewed and conducting waveguides are treated thoroughly, both rectangular and cylindrical. This leads directly to dielectric slab waveguides, dielectric cylinders, and optical fibers. Practical versions of optical fibers are stressed.

Topics covered: Introduction. What is a wave? Wave equations. Action at a distance and with delay. Maxwell’s equations. Wave designators. Poynting’s theorem. Waves in the frequency domain; interpretation of complex fields. Polarization. Narrow-band signals; group velocity; dispersion relations. Complex Poynting theorem. Complex permittivity. Waves in conductors. Boundary conditions. Matched and mismatched impedances. Reflection and transmission coefficients. Antireflection coatings. Oblique waves; Snell’s laws; Brewster’s angle. Total internal reflection; significance for dielectric waveguides. Transmission lines; coaxial line. Characteristic impedance. Standing wave ratio; impedance measurements. TE and TM waves in conducting waveguides. Rectangular and cylindrical waveguides. Waves below cutoff. Power flow. Bessel functions. Integrated optics; slab waveguides; cutoff conditions. Tunneling. Step-index fiber. Hybrid modes; dominant mode. Practical versions of optical fibers; numerical aperture; LP modes; single-mode fiber; attenuation; material and multimode dispersion. Graded-index fibers. Wave launching. Mode coupling.

Class schedule: Three one-hour lectures per week.

Professional component contributions: Students learn how waveguiding systems operate and are designed. They learn how to apply Maxwell’s equations and how to interpret the mathematical solutions. Tradeoffs and design considerations involved in integrated optics systems and in the use of optical fibers are developed.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

EE objective A: This course teaches how to solve electrical engineering problems in waveguiding systems and stresses applications of optical fibers.

EE objective B: This is the follow-up elective course in electromagnetics for electrical engineering students who want more depth in the area of applications of waveguiding systems. It prepares them for work in the electromagnetics area and in the physical side of electrical engineering.

EE objective E: A number of topics involve design considerations and techniques, particularly some practical aspects of fiber optics.

Assessments: A midterm and a final examination assess student progress; homework performance counts toward the grade. Students are asked to complete course evaluation questionnaires.

Actions taken to improve course: The instructor wrote a textbook specifically for this course, so students can follow the lectures with collateral reading. A sample of optical fiber is circulated in class to help students gain an appreciation of the scale and material involved.

Prepared by: Paul Diament

Date prepared: May 9, 2000


E.E. E4411 Fundamentals of Photonics


Description:
This is the basic professional course for research and engineering in optical devices. It presents the fundamental principles underlying the hardware side of such optics-based technologies as optical communication, optical storage, optical sensors, and lasers. The course treats light propagation at the ray and wave level, with applications to optical components and systems. The course also provides an introduction to quantum electronics and light/matter interactions, with applications to lasers and semiconductor optical devices. The emphasis in the course is on fundamentals, but illustrations are presented to draw the connection to current applications.

Prerequisites: EE E3401, Electromagnetic Theory

Text: B. E. A. Saleh and M. C. Teich, Fundamentals of Photonics (New York: Wiley, 1991).

Course Objectives: The aim of this course is to introduce students to the area of photonics, a topic not otherwise covered in the curriculum, but of increasing technological importance. The emphasis in the course is on teaching the students the fundamental principles and how to apply them. The students are expected to learn the principles sufficiently well to apply them to the analysis and design of simple optical components and systems. An additional component of the course involves enhancing the students’ skills at technical presentation and independent research. This is accomplished by requiring them to prepare a research report on a subject related to the course.

Topics Covered: The course covers both optics in passive media and active optical devices. In the former category, we introduce treatments of optics and beam propagation at the level of ray and wave optics. We review the properties of basic optical elements (lenses, mirrors, prisms, etc.) from these two perspectives and consider in some detail the properties of Gaussian beams and resonator structures. In addition, we present basic properties of quantized light fields, i.e., of the photon description of electromagnetic radiation. The second portion of the course is devoted primarily to understanding lasers. We examine the nature of light/matter interaction from a general perspective. We then discuss optical gain and laser amplifiers, before turning to the laser itself. The optical properties of semiconductors and their use in optical devices are presented.

Class/Laboratory Schedule: Two lectures of 1 hour and 15 minutes duration per week.

Professional Component Contributions: The students in this course are required to solve a variety of optical design problems as part of their homework assignments. They must also submit a research paper on a topic of their choosing. The level and style of presentation in this paper is expected to approach that of a professional technical paper. This experience improves the students’ communications skills and enhances their ability to find and use information in the technical literature.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

EE Objective A: Although not a basic science or mathematics, this course builds on the foundations provided by these courses, enhances their impact, and expands their depth. In particular, the students’ understanding of basic physics concepts related to wave propagation and light/matter interaction is deepened, as is their facility with vector and Fourier analysis. The course has a strong emphasis on fundamental principles and provides physics and math background material as required.

EE Objective B: This course offers an introduction to a branch of electrical engineering of considerable current relevance and interest. The emphasis of the course is, however, on fundamentals. This approach, it is hoped, will prove to be of greatest lasting value in an environment of rapid change. The emphasis on fundamental principles is complemented with a strong component of problem solving in which the general principles are applied to the analysis and design of optical components and systems. While the course does not include a laboratory component, these problems are often related to specific applications and real-world phenomena. This serves to develop the thinking necessary to link theory and practice. Also included as part of the course is a tour of and demonstration in the photonics research labs at Columbia

EE Objective C: Students must prepare a research paper on a topic of their choosing related to the subject matter of the course. The students are required to find the relevant original literature and present this material at a level approaching that of a professional paper. They are required to provide full referencing, to include appropriate graphs, diagrams, and figures, and to write a suitable abstract and conclusion. This facet of the course serves several purposes: It helps the students to learn how to formulate and delineate a suitable topic; it teaches them about the technical literature and how to search it; it improves their skill in written exposition of technical material; and it exposes them to the standards of the professional literature.

EE Objective D: Economic issues and the impact of new technology, while certainly not the primary focus of the course, sometimes enter into discussions of current applications. This is particularly true for the area of components for optical communication systems, which are driving a revolution in the availability of high bandwidth networks.

EE Objective E: In the lectures, optical design issues are highlighted as illustrations of the basic principles presented in the course. The homework assignments, which are quite demanding, also regularly require the design of various optical components and systems.

How Assessed: (not required by ABET) A student questionnaire is given approximately 1 month into the course and at the end of the course. These questionnaires solicit a general assessment of the course. They also ask for specific suggestions about the content and pace of the presentation.

Actions Taken to Improve Course: (not require by ABET) The subject matter of the course has been modified to provide greater emphasis on semiconductor photonic devices. This corresponds to a vibrant technology area and evokes a high level of student interest. More generally, increased emphasis is being placed on relating the fundamental material of the course to specific current applications, such as optical switching. In addition, a tour of photonics research labs at Columbia will be provided to students this year. In a different vein, all course materials are now made available on the web for increased convenience and accessibility.

Prepared by: Prof. Tony Heinz

Date Prepared: Sept. 5, 2000.


EE E4501x Electromagnetic Devices and Energy

Description: Energy storage and transfer in stationary electromagnetic devices. Linear and nonlinear circuit behavior of these devices. Analysis of electromechanical systems. Rotating and linear motion machines.

Prerequisites: EE E3401, EE E3201

Texts: Stationary Electromagnetic Devices, A.K. Sen, Printed class notes, Columbia University.

Electromechanical Dynamics, Part I, John Wiley.

Course Objectives: To teach the basic phenomena of electric and magnetic energy storage, loss and transfer common to all electromagnetic devices. Also teach the methodologies of analyzing the coupled electrical and mechanical behavior of all electromechanical system.

Topics Covered: Linear and nonlinear magnetic circuits. Electric and magnetic energy storage, loss, and transfer. Circuit behavior of energy storage and transfer devices. Field theory of moving bodies. Dynamical equations of an electromechanical system. Solutions of the linearity systems. Phenomena of electric to mechanical power and vice-versa. Rotating electric energy converters. Superconductivity and applications.

Class Schedule: The Class of 75 minutes session is held twice a week.

Professional Component Contributions: Learning of the basic principles of operation of all stationary electromagnetic devices and all electromechanical systems. These include energy, storage, power, energy loss, power transfer, energy conversion and transduction.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

Program Objective A: The course uses a heavy dose of basic science (physics), mathematics (vector algebra, partial differential equations) and engineering fundamentals (circuit theory and engineering horse sense).

Program Objective B: Students learn how to analyze any electromagnetic device or system via mathematical modeling of the basic physical phenomena. They also learn how to make approximating and the limits they impose on the models.

Program Objective C: Students learn how to communicate their ideas and understanding via strong discussions on deep fundamental questions raised in the class.

Multidisciplinary as part is heavily implemented through analysis and understanding of electro- mechanical systems which couple electrical and mechanical dynamics.

Program Objective D: This is accomplished by the curriculum as awhile, which has liberal arts, humanities and other cultures requirements.

Program Objective E: This is done very well in this course via teaching the origin of circuit theory in electromagnetic theory, demonstrating commonalities of electro-mechanical systems dynamics with electric circuits and systems theory.

How Assessed: School wide course evaluation by the students.

Actions Taken to Improve the Course: Including more concrete real life examples.

Prepared by: Amiya K. Sen

Date Prepared: June 8, 2000


E. E. E4503x Sensors, Actuators, and Electromechanical Systems

Description: Analysis of electromechanical dynamics. Electromechanical actuators and sensors. IC processed micro-machines. Thermal sensors. Electro-optic sensors. Magnetic-field sensors.

Prerequisite: EE E3201, EE E3401

Texts: Sensor Technology and Devices, Ljubisa Ristic ed, Artech House, Boston, London.

Class notes.

Course Objective: Awareness of ubiquitous use of sensors and actuators is industrial, automotive, transportation, telecommunications, robotics, health care etc. Micromachining technology in semiconductors modeling and performance analysis.

Topics Covered: Dynamics of electromechanical systems. Linearization of nonlinear coupled dynamical equations and equivalent circuits. Electromechanical actuators: acoustic, IC processed micromachines. Electromechanical sensors: acoustic, pressure, and acceleration. Thermal sensors: polysilicon thermopiles and bipolar transistor temperature sensors. Electro-optic sensors: visible light, infared, and x-ray.

Class Schedule: The class of 75 minutes session is held twice a week.

Professional Component Contributions: Principles of electromechanical, electro-thermal electro-optic and electro-radiation transduction. Semi-conductor sensors and actuators via bulk and surface micro-machining technology.

Relationship Program Objectives:

Program Objective A: The course is based on basic science (semi-conductor physics), mathematics (partial and ordinary differential equations) and engineering fundamentals (electronic circuits).

Program Objective B: Students learn a variety of transduction phenomena: electro-mechanical, electro-thermal, electro-optic and electro-radiation. They learn about fabrication of a variety of sensors and actuators based on above via bulk and surface micro-machinery of semiconductors.

Program Objective C: Students learn to communicate their ideas and thinking process via vigorous discussions in the class.

Program Objective D: This is accomplished by the curriculum as a whole, which includes liberal arts, humanities and other cultures requirements.

Program Objective E: This is well accomplished via clear integration of their knowledge of semiconductor physics from and circuits from and electric from.

How assessed: School comes evaluation by the students.

Actions Taken to Improve the Course: Reducing the member and types of devices coned by the course and deepening the study of a reduced set of the same.


EE-ME E4601 Digital Control Systems

Spring Semester 2000

1999-2000 Catalog Data: EE-ME E4601. Digital control systems. 3pts. Professor Longman. Prerequisite: EE-ME E3601 or EE E3202. Real time control of dynamic systems using digital computers. Z-transform methods. Discrete equivalents to continuous systems. Sampled data systems. Root locus and frequency response methods. State-space design techniques. Sample rate selection. Problems with discretization and numerical roundoff.

Textbook: B. C. Kuo, Digital Control Systems, Harcourt, 1992

Reference: None

Coordinator: Richard W. Longman, Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Prerequisite by Topics

A course in classical control systems or signal processing

Topics:

1. Solution of ODE’s

2. Analogous solutions of difference equations

3. Z-transforms and transfer functions

4. Stability of digital systems, Jury test

5. State space models of digital systems

6. Bilinear transformation and Routh

7. PID controllers in digital systems

8. Analysis of natural, forced responses, and disturbance response


Evaluations

1. Weekly homework assignments

2. Midterm examination (1 hour)

3. Final examination (3 hours)

Prepared by: R. W. Longman

Signature April 2000


EE E4703 Wireless Communications

Description: Wireless communication systems. Systems design fundamentals. Trunking theory. Mobile radio propagation. Reflection of radio waves. Fading and multipath. Modulation techniques; signal space; probability of error; spread spectrum. Diversity. Multiple access.

Lecture: 3 hrs. Credits: 3

Prerequisites: EE E3701 (Intro. to communications systems and networks) or the equivalent.

Text: T. Rappaport, Wireless Communications – Principles and Practice, Prentice Hall, 1996

Course objectives: To introduce the principles and concepts of modern wireless communications. To illustrate the confluence of a host of engineering issues, including systems theory, signal transmission, signal processing, trunking theory, queuing theory, antenna theory, optical issues, stochastic processes, modulation techniques, coding, multiple access. To enable students to appreciate the design, development, evaluation, and comparison of engineering systems and their tradeoffs.

Topics covered: Introduction to Wireless Communication Systems: mobile radio, cellular telephony. Systems Design Fundamentals: cellular concept, hexagonal cell model, channel assignment, handoff strategies, channel reuse. Trunking Theory; grade of service, traffic intensity, blocking, queuing, Erlang B&C formulas. Mobile Radio Propagation: large-scale path loss, antenna fundamentals, radiation intensity, system parameters, gain, effective area, power transmission, reciprocity, Friis formulas. Reflection of Radio Waves: Snell's laws, Fresnel reflection coefficients, ground reflection model, diffraction, Fresnel zones, scattering, path loss models. Factors that affect fading, Doppler shifts, multipath channel, flat vs frequency selective and fast vs slow fading. Modulation techniques: amplitude modulation, single sideband, frequency and phase modulation, digital modulation, pulse shaping, signal space and probability of error, spread spectrum. Equalization, Diversity, Channel Coding: adaptive equalization; microscopic and macroscopic diversity; polarization, frequency, and time diversity; coding, block codes, convolutional codes. Multiple Access Techniques: frequency-, time-, code-, and space-division multiple access; packet radio.

Class schedule: Three one-hour lectures per week.

Professional component contributions: Students learn how wireless communication systems operate and are designed. They learn how to apply engineering concepts from a variety of fields, including wave propagation, filter circuits, probabilistic calculations, state diagrams, antennas and propagation, wave diffraction and scattering, Doppler shifts, the uncertainty principle, modulation techniques, Nyquist criterion, signal space, noisy channels, correlation techniques, adaptive systems. Tradeoffs and design considerations involved in efficient utilization of bandwidth and other scarce resources are developed.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

EE objective A: This course teaches how to solve electrical engineering problems in communication systems and stresses engineering solutions in the wireless domain.

EE objective B: This course prepares students for work in the wireless communications area and for more advanced work in modern communications.

EE objective E: Most topics treated involve design considerations and techniques, particularly some practical engineering tradeoffs.

Assessments: A midterm and a final examination assess student progress; homework performance counts toward the grade. Students are asked to complete course evaluation questionnaires.

Actions taken to improve course: The instructor amplifies and supplements those topics that are inadequately treated in the textbook, particularly on antenna fundamentals, including derivations and demonstrations of formulas that are not fully developed in the text. The course webpage includes two Java programs to help students evaluate the Erlang formulas and probabilistic calculations. It also includes a review of the decibel scale for those who may have less than the usual preparation.

Prepared by: Paul Diament

Date prepared: May 9, 2000


EE E4810x: Digital Signal Processing

Description: Digital filtering in time and frequency domain, including: properties of discrete-time signals and systems, sampling theory, transform analysis, system structures, IIR and FIR filter design techniques, the Discrete Fourier Transform, Fast Fourier Transforms.

Prerequisites: EE E3202.

Text: S.K. Mitra. Digital Signal Processing, A Computer-Based Approach.

McGraw-Hill, 1998

Course Objectives: To provide the theoretical and practical foundation for understanding the nature of discrete-time signals and systems, in a step-by-step manner, and to prepare the students for all graduate courses in the signal processing area, including audio, image and video processing.

Topics Covered: Time-Domain and Frequency-Domain Representation of Discrete-Time Signals and Systems, Digital Processing of Continuous-Time Signals, Digital Filter Structures, Infinite Impulse Response Digital Filter Design, Finite Impulse Response Digital Filter Design, Properties of the Discrete Fourier Transform, Fast Fourier Transforms, Analysis of Finite Word-Length Effects, Multi-Rate Digital Signal Processing.

Class/Laboratory Schedule: One 2h 30min lecture each week. One computer project, in which any computer facility/language is acceptable. Suggested topics are given, but any other proposal for a DSP project are considered. Teaming up with a partner is encouraged for this project. Approximately ten homework assignments and two written tests (midterm and final exam).

Professional Component Contributions: Students obtain the skills to design and analyze digital filters and to simulate their behavior using computer tools. They also obtain the knowledge for various forms of digital signal representation and decomposition. These skills are required in the telecommunications and computer industry.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

  1. Hands-on approach in using complex analysis tools for the frequency-domain representation of digital signals and systems
  2. Students learn to design digital filters, an essential tool in electrical engineering
  3.  

  4. Students are encouraged to team up with a partner in fulfilling the project requirements, thus promoting an environment of synergistic communication.
  5. Applications of digital signal processing are presented in numerous fields (even including biomolecular sequence analysis), so that students appreciate the broadness of the field and are exposed to other disciplines.
  6.  

  7. A computer project of digital filter design is a requirement of the class.

How Assessed: homework 10%, project 30%, midterm 25%, final 35%,

Actions Taken to Improve Course: In appreciation of the importance of direct verification of the theoretical concepts using computer simulation, the course has been re-designed to include MATLAB exercises.

Prepared by: Dimitris Anastassiou

Date Prepared: May 10, 2000


EE E4830 Digital Image Processing


Description: Introduction to the mathematical tools and algorithmic/system implementation for representation and processing of digital still and moving pictures. Topics include image representation, digitization, halftoning, linear and nonlinear filtering, image transform, enhancement, restoration, segmentation, motion analysis, and coding for compression.

Prerequisites:

EE E3202 Signals and Systems I and EE E3203 Signals and Systems II

Texts:

(Required book)

Anil K. Jain, Fundamentals of Digital Image Processing, Prentice Hall, 1989.

(Recommended books)

Arun N. Netravali, Barry G. Haskell, Digital Pictures, Plenum, 2e, 1995.

Kenneth R. Castleman, Digital Image Processing, Prentice Hall, 1996.

Gonzalez and Woods, Digital Image Processing, Addison Wesley, 1992.

Course Objectives:

To provide the theoretical and practical foundation for understanding the nature of digital images and designing digital image processing systems. Students will gain skills of algorithm design, mathematical analysis, and practical implementations of various digital image processing algorithms and systems in practical applications.

Topics Covered:

Digital image acquisition, digitization, representation, coding, transforms, enhancement, segmentation, restoration, and indexing. Issues of system integration involving practical applications (broadcast, medical, satellite, consumer) are also discussed.

Class/Laboratory Schedule:

Two 75-minute lectures each week. Approximately six bi-weekly homeworks including both analytic questions and programming problems (e.g., image transform coding, quality enhancement filters). Examples were shown in lectures as well as on the course web site. Students have access to PCs and workstations in the computer lab in the department (I-Lab) as well as the computer lab in the Engineering School.

Professional Component Contributions:

Students obtain the skills to design and analyze algorithms and systems for digital image processing. They also learn how to model and analyze various components of the chain of digital image acquisition, processing, and presentation. These skills are important for the multimedia, telecommunication, and computer industries.

Relationship to Program Objectives:

  • Students expand what they learn in the basic Signal and Systems course and understand the nature of digital image data (including video) and processing of such data.
  • Students learn skills in theoretical analysis and practical implementation of digital image algorithms and systems. The system-level analysis skills are important in the EE program.
  • Applications of digital image processing are important in several fields, such as computer, telecommunication, biomedical, multimedia, etc.
  • Students are encouraged to apply what they learn in this course in other hands-on design projects (such as microprocessor lab and EE projects).
  • The course requires understanding and integration of knowledge learned from several basic courses in EE, such as Signals and Systems, Probability, and Calculus.
  • How Assessed: (not required by ABET)

    6 homeworks (including analytic questions and mini programming) 40%, midterm 30%, final 30%

    Actions Taken to Improve Course: (not require by ABET)

    Computer simulations of image processing algorithms are shown in the lectures as well as on the class web site. Students have the chance to experiment with different algorithms on actual image data in homework assignments.

    Prepared by:

    Shih-Fu Chang

    Date Prepared:

    May 2000